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Speaker: Karin Morrison

Karin Morrison introduces us to the Visible Thinking program, a research-based approach to teaching thinking begun at Harvard's Project Zero. The program develops students' thinking dispositions as well as deepens their understanding of content.

Views 7,633
Date added: 22 May 2013
Duration: 4:31

Hi my name's Karin Morrison, I'm from Melbourne Australia, and my job is the Director of the Development centre at Independent Schools Victoria. A major part of my role is coordinating the professional learning of teachers across the state, principals also, leadership programmes, and also looking at innovation, innovation education and supporting schools in bringing innovation into their schools. I'm also a faculty member of Harvard Graduate School of Education summer institutes, the Project Zero classroom - the future of learning, and an instructor for their wide online course - making thinking visible.

I'm really focusing on the ideas developed by Project Zero of Harvard Graduate School of Education - visible thinking. What visible thinking is and why, and developing and sustaining a culture of thinking. Either in your school or actually in your organisation too. It's really important stuff - I think, I believe.

Visible thinking is a framework that has been developed, very strongly researched based, but it's been developed to deepen understanding. To help, if applied specifically to classrooms, to help students not just learn the content but to actually understand what it is all about. And in the process, because it is so well developed with really good structures and strategies it also helps with intellectual development along the way at the same time.

Well there are quite a few routines and structures that have been developed to assist in this and even just the title of making thinking visible is sort of really interesting because, hey, thinking is all inside, it's such an abstract thing, how do we know what another person is thinking? And especially when you are thinking about in a school situation, when we are teaching children to help develop their understanding and to progress where do you even start if you don't even know where their thinking is at, and is what your teaching relevant to what they need where they are?

So the structures and strategies of visible thinking, there's a whole series called thinking routines. And they are very simple steps they usually only have a few words in them and a few steps to them so they are very accessible and very applicable to many different contexts, different age groups, different subjects. But they help students articulate what they're thinking. 

And it might be a routine, say, connect, extend, challenge, that's just one routine - connect, extend, challenge. Okay, so maybe if they have heard something on the news or they've had a lesson about something in history, or a new poem and the teacher might say, "Hey, how does this connect with what you already knew about that, have you got some thoughts, how does it connect?" And children will often write it on post it notes and things like that, that they can put up, so there might be a big chart saying 'Connect' and all the children put their connections on it with post it notes say. And then that's there for all to see and think about and talk about. 

And because they don't have to put their names on these post it, that's just one way to do it, they don't have to put their names on their post it notes there's not that inhibition, "what if I'm connecting to something that might be irrelevant or silly, or something that might be a bit off beat". And then there will be a little bit of discussion about that. "Let's read through these, Let's have a look. Isn't it interesting that connection with ..." and so on. And then the next step will be and "how did that image, or that story, or depending what it was about, extend your thinking in this area?" And children will talk about how their growth has changed, how it's moved forward. And the last part - challenge - well what challenge does this raise? And that may lead on to further exploration. And that can all be done with post its, it can be done with class discussions, it could be done in many different ways.

And all the routines are basically as simple as that. Very small steps, but what they actually uncover can be very deep.

Because if we want to as educators provide the very best teaching we can do, if we've got ways to uncover where children are at and take them further, and let them raise the questions and puzzles and really their curiosity in ways that they are aware of then we can shape where we go from there that is relevant and meaningful and connects with obviously what we want to cover in curriculum as well. 

Hi my name's Karin Morrison, I'm from Melbourne Australia, and my job is the Director of the Development centre at Independent Schools Victoria. A major part of my role is coordinating the professional learning of teachers across the state, principals also, leadership programmes, and also looking at innovation, innovation education and supporting schools in bringing innovation into their schools. I'm also a faculty member of Harvard Graduate School of Education summer institutes, the Project Zero classroom - the future of learning, and an instructor for their wide online course - making thinking visible.

I'm really focusing on the ideas developed by Project Zero of Harvard Graduate School of Education - visible thinking. What visible thinking is and why, and developing and sustaining a culture of thinking. Either in your school or actually in your organisation too. It's really important stuff - I think, I believe.

Visible thinking is a framework that has been developed, very strongly researched based, but it's been developed to deepen understanding. To help, if applied specifically to classrooms, to help students not just learn the content but to actually understand what it is all about. And in the process, because it is so well developed with really good structures and strategies it also helps with intellectual development along the way at the same time.

Well there are quite a few routines and structures that have been developed to assist in this and even just the title of making thinking visible is sort of really interesting because, hey, thinking is all inside, it's such an abstract thing, how do we know what another person is thinking? And especially when you are thinking about in a school situation, when we are teaching children to help develop their understanding and to progress where do you even start if you don't even know where their thinking is at, and is what your teaching relevant to what they need where they are?

So the structures and strategies of visible thinking, there's a whole series called thinking routines. And they are very simple steps they usually only have a few words in them and a few steps to them so they are very accessible and very applicable to many different contexts, different age groups, different subjects. But they help students articulate what they're thinking. 

And it might be a routine, say, connect, extend, challenge, that's just one routine - connect, extend, challenge. Okay, so maybe if they have heard something on the news or they've had a lesson about something in history, or a new poem and the teacher might say, "Hey, how does this connect with what you already knew about that, have you got some thoughts, how does it connect?" And children will often write it on post it notes and things like that, that they can put up, so there might be a big chart saying 'Connect' and all the children put their connections on it with post it notes say. And then that's there for all to see and think about and talk about. 

And because they don't have to put their names on these post it, that's just one way to do it, they don't have to put their names on their post it notes there's not that inhibition, "what if I'm connecting to something that might be irrelevant or silly, or something that might be a bit off beat". And then there will be a little bit of discussion about that. "Let's read through these, Let's have a look. Isn't it interesting that connection with ..." and so on. And then the next step will be and "how did that image, or that story, or depending what it was about, extend your thinking in this area?" And children will talk about how their growth has changed, how it's moved forward. And the last part - challenge - well what challenge does this raise? And that may lead on to further exploration. And that can all be done with post its, it can be done with class discussions, it could be done in many different ways.

And all the routines are basically as simple as that. Very small steps, but what they actually uncover can be very deep.

Because if we want to as educators provide the very best teaching we can do, if we've got ways to uncover where children are at and take them further, and let them raise the questions and puzzles and really their curiosity in ways that they are aware of then we can shape where we go from there that is relevant and meaningful and connects with obviously what we want to cover in curriculum as well. 

Date added: 05/22/2013
Making thinking visible
Date added: 05/22/2013

Making thinking visible

Karin Morrison introduces us to the Visible Thinking program, a research-based approach to teaching thinking begun at Harvard's Project Zero. The program develops students' thinking dispositions as well as deepens their understanding of content.

Views 7,633 Date added: 22/05/2013

Making thinking visible

Hi my name's Karin Morrison, I'm from Melbourne Australia, and my job is the Director of the Development centre at Independent Schools Victoria. A major part of my role is coordinating the professional learning of teachers across the state, principals also, leadership programmes, and also looking at innovation, innovation education and supporting schools in bringing innovation into their schools. I'm also a faculty member of Harvard Graduate School of Education summer institutes, the Project Zero classroom - the future of learning, and an instructor for their wide online course - making thinking visible.

I'm really focusing on the ideas developed by Project Zero of Harvard Graduate School of Education - visible thinking. What visible thinking is and why, and developing and sustaining a culture of thinking. Either in your school or actually in your organisation too. It's really important stuff - I think, I believe.

Visible thinking is a framework that has been developed, very strongly researched based, but it's been developed to deepen understanding. To help, if applied specifically to classrooms, to help students not just learn the content but to actually understand what it is all about. And in the process, because it is so well developed with really good structures and strategies it also helps with intellectual development along the way at the same time.

Well there are quite a few routines and structures that have been developed to assist in this and even just the title of making thinking visible is sort of really interesting because, hey, thinking is all inside, it's such an abstract thing, how do we know what another person is thinking? And especially when you are thinking about in a school situation, when we are teaching children to help develop their understanding and to progress where do you even start if you don't even know where their thinking is at, and is what your teaching relevant to what they need where they are?

So the structures and strategies of visible thinking, there's a whole series called thinking routines. And they are very simple steps they usually only have a few words in them and a few steps to them so they are very accessible and very applicable to many different contexts, different age groups, different subjects. But they help students articulate what they're thinking. 

And it might be a routine, say, connect, extend, challenge, that's just one routine - connect, extend, challenge. Okay, so maybe if they have heard something on the news or they've had a lesson about something in history, or a new poem and the teacher might say, "Hey, how does this connect with what you already knew about that, have you got some thoughts, how does it connect?" And children will often write it on post it notes and things like that, that they can put up, so there might be a big chart saying 'Connect' and all the children put their connections on it with post it notes say. And then that's there for all to see and think about and talk about. 

And because they don't have to put their names on these post it, that's just one way to do it, they don't have to put their names on their post it notes there's not that inhibition, "what if I'm connecting to something that might be irrelevant or silly, or something that might be a bit off beat". And then there will be a little bit of discussion about that. "Let's read through these, Let's have a look. Isn't it interesting that connection with ..." and so on. And then the next step will be and "how did that image, or that story, or depending what it was about, extend your thinking in this area?" And children will talk about how their growth has changed, how it's moved forward. And the last part - challenge - well what challenge does this raise? And that may lead on to further exploration. And that can all be done with post its, it can be done with class discussions, it could be done in many different ways.

And all the routines are basically as simple as that. Very small steps, but what they actually uncover can be very deep.

Because if we want to as educators provide the very best teaching we can do, if we've got ways to uncover where children are at and take them further, and let them raise the questions and puzzles and really their curiosity in ways that they are aware of then we can shape where we go from there that is relevant and meaningful and connects with obviously what we want to cover in curriculum as well. 

Hi my name's Karin Morrison, I'm from Melbourne Australia, and my job is the Director of the Development centre at Independent Schools Victoria. A major part of my role is coordinating the professional learning of teachers across the state, principals also, leadership programmes, and also looking at innovation, innovation education and supporting schools in bringing innovation into their schools. I'm also a faculty member of Harvard Graduate School of Education summer institutes, the Project Zero classroom - the future of learning, and an instructor for their wide online course - making thinking visible.

I'm really focusing on the ideas developed by Project Zero of Harvard Graduate School of Education - visible thinking. What visible thinking is and why, and developing and sustaining a culture of thinking. Either in your school or actually in your organisation too. It's really important stuff - I think, I believe.

Visible thinking is a framework that has been developed, very strongly researched based, but it's been developed to deepen understanding. To help, if applied specifically to classrooms, to help students not just learn the content but to actually understand what it is all about. And in the process, because it is so well developed with really good structures and strategies it also helps with intellectual development along the way at the same time.

Well there are quite a few routines and structures that have been developed to assist in this and even just the title of making thinking visible is sort of really interesting because, hey, thinking is all inside, it's such an abstract thing, how do we know what another person is thinking? And especially when you are thinking about in a school situation, when we are teaching children to help develop their understanding and to progress where do you even start if you don't even know where their thinking is at, and is what your teaching relevant to what they need where they are?

So the structures and strategies of visible thinking, there's a whole series called thinking routines. And they are very simple steps they usually only have a few words in them and a few steps to them so they are very accessible and very applicable to many different contexts, different age groups, different subjects. But they help students articulate what they're thinking. 

And it might be a routine, say, connect, extend, challenge, that's just one routine - connect, extend, challenge. Okay, so maybe if they have heard something on the news or they've had a lesson about something in history, or a new poem and the teacher might say, "Hey, how does this connect with what you already knew about that, have you got some thoughts, how does it connect?" And children will often write it on post it notes and things like that, that they can put up, so there might be a big chart saying 'Connect' and all the children put their connections on it with post it notes say. And then that's there for all to see and think about and talk about. 

And because they don't have to put their names on these post it, that's just one way to do it, they don't have to put their names on their post it notes there's not that inhibition, "what if I'm connecting to something that might be irrelevant or silly, or something that might be a bit off beat". And then there will be a little bit of discussion about that. "Let's read through these, Let's have a look. Isn't it interesting that connection with ..." and so on. And then the next step will be and "how did that image, or that story, or depending what it was about, extend your thinking in this area?" And children will talk about how their growth has changed, how it's moved forward. And the last part - challenge - well what challenge does this raise? And that may lead on to further exploration. And that can all be done with post its, it can be done with class discussions, it could be done in many different ways.

And all the routines are basically as simple as that. Very small steps, but what they actually uncover can be very deep.

Because if we want to as educators provide the very best teaching we can do, if we've got ways to uncover where children are at and take them further, and let them raise the questions and puzzles and really their curiosity in ways that they are aware of then we can shape where we go from there that is relevant and meaningful and connects with obviously what we want to cover in curriculum as well. 

Date added: 22/05/2013

Making thinking visible

Karin Morrison introduces us to the Visible Thinking program, a research-based approach to teaching thinking begun at Harvard's Project Zero. The program develops students' thinking dispositions as well as deepens their understanding of content.

Views 7,633 Date added: 22/05/2013

Making thinking visible

Hi my name's Karin Morrison, I'm from Melbourne Australia, and my job is the Director of the Development centre at Independent Schools Victoria. A major part of my role is coordinating the professional learning of teachers across the state, principals also, leadership programmes, and also looking at innovation, innovation education and supporting schools in bringing innovation into their schools. I'm also a faculty member of Harvard Graduate School of Education summer institutes, the Project Zero classroom - the future of learning, and an instructor for their wide online course - making thinking visible.

I'm really focusing on the ideas developed by Project Zero of Harvard Graduate School of Education - visible thinking. What visible thinking is and why, and developing and sustaining a culture of thinking. Either in your school or actually in your organisation too. It's really important stuff - I think, I believe.

Visible thinking is a framework that has been developed, very strongly researched based, but it's been developed to deepen understanding. To help, if applied specifically to classrooms, to help students not just learn the content but to actually understand what it is all about. And in the process, because it is so well developed with really good structures and strategies it also helps with intellectual development along the way at the same time.

Well there are quite a few routines and structures that have been developed to assist in this and even just the title of making thinking visible is sort of really interesting because, hey, thinking is all inside, it's such an abstract thing, how do we know what another person is thinking? And especially when you are thinking about in a school situation, when we are teaching children to help develop their understanding and to progress where do you even start if you don't even know where their thinking is at, and is what your teaching relevant to what they need where they are?

So the structures and strategies of visible thinking, there's a whole series called thinking routines. And they are very simple steps they usually only have a few words in them and a few steps to them so they are very accessible and very applicable to many different contexts, different age groups, different subjects. But they help students articulate what they're thinking. 

And it might be a routine, say, connect, extend, challenge, that's just one routine - connect, extend, challenge. Okay, so maybe if they have heard something on the news or they've had a lesson about something in history, or a new poem and the teacher might say, "Hey, how does this connect with what you already knew about that, have you got some thoughts, how does it connect?" And children will often write it on post it notes and things like that, that they can put up, so there might be a big chart saying 'Connect' and all the children put their connections on it with post it notes say. And then that's there for all to see and think about and talk about. 

And because they don't have to put their names on these post it, that's just one way to do it, they don't have to put their names on their post it notes there's not that inhibition, "what if I'm connecting to something that might be irrelevant or silly, or something that might be a bit off beat". And then there will be a little bit of discussion about that. "Let's read through these, Let's have a look. Isn't it interesting that connection with ..." and so on. And then the next step will be and "how did that image, or that story, or depending what it was about, extend your thinking in this area?" And children will talk about how their growth has changed, how it's moved forward. And the last part - challenge - well what challenge does this raise? And that may lead on to further exploration. And that can all be done with post its, it can be done with class discussions, it could be done in many different ways.

And all the routines are basically as simple as that. Very small steps, but what they actually uncover can be very deep.

Because if we want to as educators provide the very best teaching we can do, if we've got ways to uncover where children are at and take them further, and let them raise the questions and puzzles and really their curiosity in ways that they are aware of then we can shape where we go from there that is relevant and meaningful and connects with obviously what we want to cover in curriculum as well. 

Hi my name's Karin Morrison, I'm from Melbourne Australia, and my job is the Director of the Development centre at Independent Schools Victoria. A major part of my role is coordinating the professional learning of teachers across the state, principals also, leadership programmes, and also looking at innovation, innovation education and supporting schools in bringing innovation into their schools. I'm also a faculty member of Harvard Graduate School of Education summer institutes, the Project Zero classroom - the future of learning, and an instructor for their wide online course - making thinking visible.

I'm really focusing on the ideas developed by Project Zero of Harvard Graduate School of Education - visible thinking. What visible thinking is and why, and developing and sustaining a culture of thinking. Either in your school or actually in your organisation too. It's really important stuff - I think, I believe.

Visible thinking is a framework that has been developed, very strongly researched based, but it's been developed to deepen understanding. To help, if applied specifically to classrooms, to help students not just learn the content but to actually understand what it is all about. And in the process, because it is so well developed with really good structures and strategies it also helps with intellectual development along the way at the same time.

Well there are quite a few routines and structures that have been developed to assist in this and even just the title of making thinking visible is sort of really interesting because, hey, thinking is all inside, it's such an abstract thing, how do we know what another person is thinking? And especially when you are thinking about in a school situation, when we are teaching children to help develop their understanding and to progress where do you even start if you don't even know where their thinking is at, and is what your teaching relevant to what they need where they are?

So the structures and strategies of visible thinking, there's a whole series called thinking routines. And they are very simple steps they usually only have a few words in them and a few steps to them so they are very accessible and very applicable to many different contexts, different age groups, different subjects. But they help students articulate what they're thinking. 

And it might be a routine, say, connect, extend, challenge, that's just one routine - connect, extend, challenge. Okay, so maybe if they have heard something on the news or they've had a lesson about something in history, or a new poem and the teacher might say, "Hey, how does this connect with what you already knew about that, have you got some thoughts, how does it connect?" And children will often write it on post it notes and things like that, that they can put up, so there might be a big chart saying 'Connect' and all the children put their connections on it with post it notes say. And then that's there for all to see and think about and talk about. 

And because they don't have to put their names on these post it, that's just one way to do it, they don't have to put their names on their post it notes there's not that inhibition, "what if I'm connecting to something that might be irrelevant or silly, or something that might be a bit off beat". And then there will be a little bit of discussion about that. "Let's read through these, Let's have a look. Isn't it interesting that connection with ..." and so on. And then the next step will be and "how did that image, or that story, or depending what it was about, extend your thinking in this area?" And children will talk about how their growth has changed, how it's moved forward. And the last part - challenge - well what challenge does this raise? And that may lead on to further exploration. And that can all be done with post its, it can be done with class discussions, it could be done in many different ways.

And all the routines are basically as simple as that. Very small steps, but what they actually uncover can be very deep.

Because if we want to as educators provide the very best teaching we can do, if we've got ways to uncover where children are at and take them further, and let them raise the questions and puzzles and really their curiosity in ways that they are aware of then we can shape where we go from there that is relevant and meaningful and connects with obviously what we want to cover in curriculum as well. 

Date added: 22/05/2013

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