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CORE Education's TenTrends for 2012

Digital Citizenship report

 

 

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CORE Education's TenTrends for 2012

Digital Citizenship report

 

 

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

Speaker: John Fenaughty

CORE Education's Dr John Fenaughty talks about some of the issues facing schools today around citizenship in the digital world. John believes that the rise in digital citizenship interest should focus on ensuring that we teach young people about using ICT to achieve what they need in a respectful and ethical way that keeps them safe.

Views 12,802
Date added: 31 Aug 2012
Duration: 5:17

Digital citizenship is sometimes seen as a kind of lofty difficult concept for people to get a handle on. Essentially citizenship refers to the bundle of rights people have in any space. And those rights come with responsibilities. Digital citizenship is the translation of those rights to cyberspace, so the Internet and mobile phones. Essentially what we're looking for in digital citizenship is the idea that people have to meet certain obligations in order to participate in this society but equally that society respects them and cares for them. 

Netsafe has a really useful way of talking about digital citizenship which see it as a nexus between digital literacy, cybersafety skills, and then key values and key competencies from the New Zealand Curriculum. And basically digital citizenship exists in the middle of those things. You can't have digital citizenship if you don't have the ability to use the Internet, if you don't know how to use it safely and you can't use it respectfully and honestly.

There is a lot driving interest in digital citizenship lately. It is very much a key theme and it has been raising, been increasing significantly in popularity in the last couple of years. What we see is in the cybersafety industry, which is now fifteen years old, previous ways of understanding how to promote cybersafety have really been falling by the wayside as we realise we cannot technologically manage these challenges and we cannot wish them away by filters and monitoring. Equally we are also aware that there are limits to the ability of education to remove risk. It is all very well that you may know how to keep yourself safe and be secure, but if the other users of the Internet do not share your responsibility and they harm you, this is a problem.

Essentially to get around this people have started to think about digital citizenship, the ability to use the Internet safely as well as respect others when you are using this space.

The other big driver for the interest in digital citizenship is the proliferation of cheap devices that young people in schools are able to use to extend elearning and virtual learning into those environments. Essentially now we are seeing a fantastic sort of example of schools embracing BYOD, but in order to do that those schools are of course bringing in another environment into their school ground, that environment of cyberspace. And that means that those students need to know how to follow the rules in the school ground as well as the rules in cyberspace.

There are clear implications about the large scale increase in the interest in digital citizenship. Essentially as I've said we've got lots of students now who are using the Internet. This is a normative space for them. And schools are increasingly using eportfolios, they are embracing BYOD, and those schools need to therefore have some ability to think strategically around how they are going to support their students to become digital citizens.

This very much raises the impetus on schools at a strategic level to think about this. This is quite critical at the moment because we see a lot of legislative change starting to bring some pressure as the public gets quite concerned about digital citizenship issues. This will then drive further actions in schools and further responsibilities for schools.

Another impact of this is for teachers' own practice. Essentially their students are going to be required to be digital citizens and they need guidance. They need teachers to be good guides of this. Yet we know from research that around half of teachers do not feel confident providing cybersafey information for students. So there is a clear impact here for students and teachers to both become upskilled in their cybersafety knowledge. 

The next question then is, given that digital citizenship is so important, what can you do about it in your practice? And we know that there are various actors in the digital citizenship debate, there are school administrators, there are policy makers, and there are individual educators. Every single one of those people has the ability to advocate for a digital citizenship strategy for their school and this is an absolutely critical thing to do.

The other thing that you can do as an educator is to use resources to enable you to support your students to become effective digital citizens. Netsafe and CORE Ed both provide lots of amazing resources to do this. Additionally there are frameworks and kits to enable schools to become centres for promoting digital citizenship and there is a lot of support available for this critical thing.

The main thing with all of this is that digital citizenship is a critical way that we can prevent concerns about safety and fears about the Internet from preventing us to really getting the most out of elearning and virtual learning. 

Digital citizenship is sometimes seen as a kind of lofty difficult concept for people to get a handle on. Essentially citizenship refers to the bundle of rights people have in any space. And those rights come with responsibilities. Digital citizenship is the translation of those rights to cyberspace, so the Internet and mobile phones. Essentially what we're looking for in digital citizenship is the idea that people have to meet certain obligations in order to participate in this society but equally that society respects them and cares for them. 

Netsafe has a really useful way of talking about digital citizenship which see it as a nexus between digital literacy, cybersafety skills, and then key values and key competencies from the New Zealand Curriculum. And basically digital citizenship exists in the middle of those things. You can't have digital citizenship if you don't have the ability to use the Internet, if you don't know how to use it safely and you can't use it respectfully and honestly.

There is a lot driving interest in digital citizenship lately. It is very much a key theme and it has been raising, been increasing significantly in popularity in the last couple of years. What we see is in the cybersafety industry, which is now fifteen years old, previous ways of understanding how to promote cybersafety have really been falling by the wayside as we realise we cannot technologically manage these challenges and we cannot wish them away by filters and monitoring. Equally we are also aware that there are limits to the ability of education to remove risk. It is all very well that you may know how to keep yourself safe and be secure, but if the other users of the Internet do not share your responsibility and they harm you, this is a problem.

Essentially to get around this people have started to think about digital citizenship, the ability to use the Internet safely as well as respect others when you are using this space.

The other big driver for the interest in digital citizenship is the proliferation of cheap devices that young people in schools are able to use to extend elearning and virtual learning into those environments. Essentially now we are seeing a fantastic sort of example of schools embracing BYOD, but in order to do that those schools are of course bringing in another environment into their school ground, that environment of cyberspace. And that means that those students need to know how to follow the rules in the school ground as well as the rules in cyberspace.

There are clear implications about the large scale increase in the interest in digital citizenship. Essentially as I've said we've got lots of students now who are using the Internet. This is a normative space for them. And schools are increasingly using eportfolios, they are embracing BYOD, and those schools need to therefore have some ability to think strategically around how they are going to support their students to become digital citizens.

This very much raises the impetus on schools at a strategic level to think about this. This is quite critical at the moment because we see a lot of legislative change starting to bring some pressure as the public gets quite concerned about digital citizenship issues. This will then drive further actions in schools and further responsibilities for schools.

Another impact of this is for teachers' own practice. Essentially their students are going to be required to be digital citizens and they need guidance. They need teachers to be good guides of this. Yet we know from research that around half of teachers do not feel confident providing cybersafey information for students. So there is a clear impact here for students and teachers to both become upskilled in their cybersafety knowledge. 

The next question then is, given that digital citizenship is so important, what can you do about it in your practice? And we know that there are various actors in the digital citizenship debate, there are school administrators, there are policy makers, and there are individual educators. Every single one of those people has the ability to advocate for a digital citizenship strategy for their school and this is an absolutely critical thing to do.

The other thing that you can do as an educator is to use resources to enable you to support your students to become effective digital citizens. Netsafe and CORE Ed both provide lots of amazing resources to do this. Additionally there are frameworks and kits to enable schools to become centres for promoting digital citizenship and there is a lot of support available for this critical thing.

The main thing with all of this is that digital citizenship is a critical way that we can prevent concerns about safety and fears about the Internet from preventing us to really getting the most out of elearning and virtual learning. 

Date added: 08/31/2012
Ten Trends 2012: Digital citizenship
Date added: 08/31/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Digital citizenship

CORE Education's Dr John Fenaughty talks about some of the issues facing schools today around citizenship in the digital world. John believes that the rise in digital citizenship interest should focus on ensuring that we teach young people about using ICT to achieve what they need in a respectful and ethical way that keeps them safe.

Views 12,802 Date added: 28/09/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Digital citizenship

Digital citizenship is sometimes seen as a kind of lofty difficult concept for people to get a handle on. Essentially citizenship refers to the bundle of rights people have in any space. And those rights come with responsibilities. Digital citizenship is the translation of those rights to cyberspace, so the Internet and mobile phones. Essentially what we're looking for in digital citizenship is the idea that people have to meet certain obligations in order to participate in this society but equally that society respects them and cares for them. 

Netsafe has a really useful way of talking about digital citizenship which see it as a nexus between digital literacy, cybersafety skills, and then key values and key competencies from the New Zealand Curriculum. And basically digital citizenship exists in the middle of those things. You can't have digital citizenship if you don't have the ability to use the Internet, if you don't know how to use it safely and you can't use it respectfully and honestly.

There is a lot driving interest in digital citizenship lately. It is very much a key theme and it has been raising, been increasing significantly in popularity in the last couple of years. What we see is in the cybersafety industry, which is now fifteen years old, previous ways of understanding how to promote cybersafety have really been falling by the wayside as we realise we cannot technologically manage these challenges and we cannot wish them away by filters and monitoring. Equally we are also aware that there are limits to the ability of education to remove risk. It is all very well that you may know how to keep yourself safe and be secure, but if the other users of the Internet do not share your responsibility and they harm you, this is a problem.

Essentially to get around this people have started to think about digital citizenship, the ability to use the Internet safely as well as respect others when you are using this space.

The other big driver for the interest in digital citizenship is the proliferation of cheap devices that young people in schools are able to use to extend elearning and virtual learning into those environments. Essentially now we are seeing a fantastic sort of example of schools embracing BYOD, but in order to do that those schools are of course bringing in another environment into their school ground, that environment of cyberspace. And that means that those students need to know how to follow the rules in the school ground as well as the rules in cyberspace.

There are clear implications about the large scale increase in the interest in digital citizenship. Essentially as I've said we've got lots of students now who are using the Internet. This is a normative space for them. And schools are increasingly using eportfolios, they are embracing BYOD, and those schools need to therefore have some ability to think strategically around how they are going to support their students to become digital citizens.

This very much raises the impetus on schools at a strategic level to think about this. This is quite critical at the moment because we see a lot of legislative change starting to bring some pressure as the public gets quite concerned about digital citizenship issues. This will then drive further actions in schools and further responsibilities for schools.

Another impact of this is for teachers' own practice. Essentially their students are going to be required to be digital citizens and they need guidance. They need teachers to be good guides of this. Yet we know from research that around half of teachers do not feel confident providing cybersafey information for students. So there is a clear impact here for students and teachers to both become upskilled in their cybersafety knowledge. 

The next question then is, given that digital citizenship is so important, what can you do about it in your practice? And we know that there are various actors in the digital citizenship debate, there are school administrators, there are policy makers, and there are individual educators. Every single one of those people has the ability to advocate for a digital citizenship strategy for their school and this is an absolutely critical thing to do.

The other thing that you can do as an educator is to use resources to enable you to support your students to become effective digital citizens. Netsafe and CORE Ed both provide lots of amazing resources to do this. Additionally there are frameworks and kits to enable schools to become centres for promoting digital citizenship and there is a lot of support available for this critical thing.

The main thing with all of this is that digital citizenship is a critical way that we can prevent concerns about safety and fears about the Internet from preventing us to really getting the most out of elearning and virtual learning. 

Digital citizenship is sometimes seen as a kind of lofty difficult concept for people to get a handle on. Essentially citizenship refers to the bundle of rights people have in any space. And those rights come with responsibilities. Digital citizenship is the translation of those rights to cyberspace, so the Internet and mobile phones. Essentially what we're looking for in digital citizenship is the idea that people have to meet certain obligations in order to participate in this society but equally that society respects them and cares for them. 

Netsafe has a really useful way of talking about digital citizenship which see it as a nexus between digital literacy, cybersafety skills, and then key values and key competencies from the New Zealand Curriculum. And basically digital citizenship exists in the middle of those things. You can't have digital citizenship if you don't have the ability to use the Internet, if you don't know how to use it safely and you can't use it respectfully and honestly.

There is a lot driving interest in digital citizenship lately. It is very much a key theme and it has been raising, been increasing significantly in popularity in the last couple of years. What we see is in the cybersafety industry, which is now fifteen years old, previous ways of understanding how to promote cybersafety have really been falling by the wayside as we realise we cannot technologically manage these challenges and we cannot wish them away by filters and monitoring. Equally we are also aware that there are limits to the ability of education to remove risk. It is all very well that you may know how to keep yourself safe and be secure, but if the other users of the Internet do not share your responsibility and they harm you, this is a problem.

Essentially to get around this people have started to think about digital citizenship, the ability to use the Internet safely as well as respect others when you are using this space.

The other big driver for the interest in digital citizenship is the proliferation of cheap devices that young people in schools are able to use to extend elearning and virtual learning into those environments. Essentially now we are seeing a fantastic sort of example of schools embracing BYOD, but in order to do that those schools are of course bringing in another environment into their school ground, that environment of cyberspace. And that means that those students need to know how to follow the rules in the school ground as well as the rules in cyberspace.

There are clear implications about the large scale increase in the interest in digital citizenship. Essentially as I've said we've got lots of students now who are using the Internet. This is a normative space for them. And schools are increasingly using eportfolios, they are embracing BYOD, and those schools need to therefore have some ability to think strategically around how they are going to support their students to become digital citizens.

This very much raises the impetus on schools at a strategic level to think about this. This is quite critical at the moment because we see a lot of legislative change starting to bring some pressure as the public gets quite concerned about digital citizenship issues. This will then drive further actions in schools and further responsibilities for schools.

Another impact of this is for teachers' own practice. Essentially their students are going to be required to be digital citizens and they need guidance. They need teachers to be good guides of this. Yet we know from research that around half of teachers do not feel confident providing cybersafey information for students. So there is a clear impact here for students and teachers to both become upskilled in their cybersafety knowledge. 

The next question then is, given that digital citizenship is so important, what can you do about it in your practice? And we know that there are various actors in the digital citizenship debate, there are school administrators, there are policy makers, and there are individual educators. Every single one of those people has the ability to advocate for a digital citizenship strategy for their school and this is an absolutely critical thing to do.

The other thing that you can do as an educator is to use resources to enable you to support your students to become effective digital citizens. Netsafe and CORE Ed both provide lots of amazing resources to do this. Additionally there are frameworks and kits to enable schools to become centres for promoting digital citizenship and there is a lot of support available for this critical thing.

The main thing with all of this is that digital citizenship is a critical way that we can prevent concerns about safety and fears about the Internet from preventing us to really getting the most out of elearning and virtual learning. 

Date added: 28/09/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Digital citizenship

CORE Education's Dr John Fenaughty talks about some of the issues facing schools today around citizenship in the digital world. John believes that the rise in digital citizenship interest should focus on ensuring that we teach young people about using ICT to achieve what they need in a respectful and ethical way that keeps them safe.

Views 12,802 Date added: 28/09/2012

Ten Trends 2012: Digital citizenship

Digital citizenship is sometimes seen as a kind of lofty difficult concept for people to get a handle on. Essentially citizenship refers to the bundle of rights people have in any space. And those rights come with responsibilities. Digital citizenship is the translation of those rights to cyberspace, so the Internet and mobile phones. Essentially what we're looking for in digital citizenship is the idea that people have to meet certain obligations in order to participate in this society but equally that society respects them and cares for them. 

Netsafe has a really useful way of talking about digital citizenship which see it as a nexus between digital literacy, cybersafety skills, and then key values and key competencies from the New Zealand Curriculum. And basically digital citizenship exists in the middle of those things. You can't have digital citizenship if you don't have the ability to use the Internet, if you don't know how to use it safely and you can't use it respectfully and honestly.

There is a lot driving interest in digital citizenship lately. It is very much a key theme and it has been raising, been increasing significantly in popularity in the last couple of years. What we see is in the cybersafety industry, which is now fifteen years old, previous ways of understanding how to promote cybersafety have really been falling by the wayside as we realise we cannot technologically manage these challenges and we cannot wish them away by filters and monitoring. Equally we are also aware that there are limits to the ability of education to remove risk. It is all very well that you may know how to keep yourself safe and be secure, but if the other users of the Internet do not share your responsibility and they harm you, this is a problem.

Essentially to get around this people have started to think about digital citizenship, the ability to use the Internet safely as well as respect others when you are using this space.

The other big driver for the interest in digital citizenship is the proliferation of cheap devices that young people in schools are able to use to extend elearning and virtual learning into those environments. Essentially now we are seeing a fantastic sort of example of schools embracing BYOD, but in order to do that those schools are of course bringing in another environment into their school ground, that environment of cyberspace. And that means that those students need to know how to follow the rules in the school ground as well as the rules in cyberspace.

There are clear implications about the large scale increase in the interest in digital citizenship. Essentially as I've said we've got lots of students now who are using the Internet. This is a normative space for them. And schools are increasingly using eportfolios, they are embracing BYOD, and those schools need to therefore have some ability to think strategically around how they are going to support their students to become digital citizens.

This very much raises the impetus on schools at a strategic level to think about this. This is quite critical at the moment because we see a lot of legislative change starting to bring some pressure as the public gets quite concerned about digital citizenship issues. This will then drive further actions in schools and further responsibilities for schools.

Another impact of this is for teachers' own practice. Essentially their students are going to be required to be digital citizens and they need guidance. They need teachers to be good guides of this. Yet we know from research that around half of teachers do not feel confident providing cybersafey information for students. So there is a clear impact here for students and teachers to both become upskilled in their cybersafety knowledge. 

The next question then is, given that digital citizenship is so important, what can you do about it in your practice? And we know that there are various actors in the digital citizenship debate, there are school administrators, there are policy makers, and there are individual educators. Every single one of those people has the ability to advocate for a digital citizenship strategy for their school and this is an absolutely critical thing to do.

The other thing that you can do as an educator is to use resources to enable you to support your students to become effective digital citizens. Netsafe and CORE Ed both provide lots of amazing resources to do this. Additionally there are frameworks and kits to enable schools to become centres for promoting digital citizenship and there is a lot of support available for this critical thing.

The main thing with all of this is that digital citizenship is a critical way that we can prevent concerns about safety and fears about the Internet from preventing us to really getting the most out of elearning and virtual learning. 

Digital citizenship is sometimes seen as a kind of lofty difficult concept for people to get a handle on. Essentially citizenship refers to the bundle of rights people have in any space. And those rights come with responsibilities. Digital citizenship is the translation of those rights to cyberspace, so the Internet and mobile phones. Essentially what we're looking for in digital citizenship is the idea that people have to meet certain obligations in order to participate in this society but equally that society respects them and cares for them. 

Netsafe has a really useful way of talking about digital citizenship which see it as a nexus between digital literacy, cybersafety skills, and then key values and key competencies from the New Zealand Curriculum. And basically digital citizenship exists in the middle of those things. You can't have digital citizenship if you don't have the ability to use the Internet, if you don't know how to use it safely and you can't use it respectfully and honestly.

There is a lot driving interest in digital citizenship lately. It is very much a key theme and it has been raising, been increasing significantly in popularity in the last couple of years. What we see is in the cybersafety industry, which is now fifteen years old, previous ways of understanding how to promote cybersafety have really been falling by the wayside as we realise we cannot technologically manage these challenges and we cannot wish them away by filters and monitoring. Equally we are also aware that there are limits to the ability of education to remove risk. It is all very well that you may know how to keep yourself safe and be secure, but if the other users of the Internet do not share your responsibility and they harm you, this is a problem.

Essentially to get around this people have started to think about digital citizenship, the ability to use the Internet safely as well as respect others when you are using this space.

The other big driver for the interest in digital citizenship is the proliferation of cheap devices that young people in schools are able to use to extend elearning and virtual learning into those environments. Essentially now we are seeing a fantastic sort of example of schools embracing BYOD, but in order to do that those schools are of course bringing in another environment into their school ground, that environment of cyberspace. And that means that those students need to know how to follow the rules in the school ground as well as the rules in cyberspace.

There are clear implications about the large scale increase in the interest in digital citizenship. Essentially as I've said we've got lots of students now who are using the Internet. This is a normative space for them. And schools are increasingly using eportfolios, they are embracing BYOD, and those schools need to therefore have some ability to think strategically around how they are going to support their students to become digital citizens.

This very much raises the impetus on schools at a strategic level to think about this. This is quite critical at the moment because we see a lot of legislative change starting to bring some pressure as the public gets quite concerned about digital citizenship issues. This will then drive further actions in schools and further responsibilities for schools.

Another impact of this is for teachers' own practice. Essentially their students are going to be required to be digital citizens and they need guidance. They need teachers to be good guides of this. Yet we know from research that around half of teachers do not feel confident providing cybersafey information for students. So there is a clear impact here for students and teachers to both become upskilled in their cybersafety knowledge. 

The next question then is, given that digital citizenship is so important, what can you do about it in your practice? And we know that there are various actors in the digital citizenship debate, there are school administrators, there are policy makers, and there are individual educators. Every single one of those people has the ability to advocate for a digital citizenship strategy for their school and this is an absolutely critical thing to do.

The other thing that you can do as an educator is to use resources to enable you to support your students to become effective digital citizens. Netsafe and CORE Ed both provide lots of amazing resources to do this. Additionally there are frameworks and kits to enable schools to become centres for promoting digital citizenship and there is a lot of support available for this critical thing.

The main thing with all of this is that digital citizenship is a critical way that we can prevent concerns about safety and fears about the Internet from preventing us to really getting the most out of elearning and virtual learning. 

Date added: 28/09/2012

 

CORE Education's TenTrends for 2012

Digital Citizenship report

 

 

Be the first to post a comment on this video.

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