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Speaker: Judy Willis

Dr Judy Willis is a board-certified neurologist and teacher from California. In this talk she outlines outlines three key things we can learn as educators from her research into student engagement with video games.

Views 10,651
Date added: 20 May 2013
Duration: 3:45

Hi my name is Dr Judy Willis, I'm a neurologist and teacher/educator and now lecturer around the world about neuroscience and how the brain works best. 

I'd like to tell you about what it is that makes the brain most motivated, engaged, perseverance, especially when they are things that the child, or student, or person doesn't want to do. When are students, for example, kids, most engaged in something? What is there that they love to do and keep doing despite set backs and failures. And it turns out, you look, and playing video games. There is something in playing video games that motivates. And I wanted to find out what it was and see if it could be applied to the classroom.

What I found out after looking at the research and my speciality of neuro-imaging, is that there are three components that are happening when a video gamer is engaged. There's buy-in, they know what they are going get even though it is fantasy. THere is achievable challenge, when someone is playing a video game they are at their right level where there is challenge but it is achievable. If they can do whatever the challenge is at level one the game doesn't make them wait for anyone else to catch up, they get advanced to level two, level three. So there's achievement, there's challenge so they are always playing at a level that is just right for them. They can't do it. 

And then there's frequent feedback. They are constantly making moves, predictions, higher, lower, how do I do that. And there's immediate feedback whether you get progressed or not.

So the three elements that we can deconstruction: buy-in, playing or learning at your achievable challenge level and frequent feedback. You do that and video game players, even though they make mistakes and fail 80% of the time, they are motivated to keep going.

So what we have learned and what this means in terms of student learning from this video game model is to incorporate certain aspects of that model in order to get students motivated, especially those who really have lost interest in a subject or lost confidence that they can do it. So we need to consider those three elements. Buy-in - making sure from the very beginning that there is something they believe will be positive if they put in the time and effort. Number two is achievable challenge. Students have different background knowledge, different prior experience so assessing what they already know, what they have mastery in, and what they lack. And making sure that differentiation and individualisation is available so that students are learning at a place that is challenging for them but it is achievable there is a possibility of being successful. 

And again with the video game model frequent corrective feedback that is letting them know whether they're progressing, whether their effort towards the goal is making a difference. In a video game they are getting points, they are getting to see that they go to another level. In school we don't frequently give the feedback of effort to progress along the way to a goal but the brain rewards the intrinsic gratification, that intrinsic pleasure is the chemical response, dopamine pleasure. And to make sure that happens, to keep kids engaged letting them know that they are making progress to that goal along the way will find that motivation mindset grow. 

Hi my name is Dr Judy Willis, I'm a neurologist and teacher/educator and now lecturer around the world about neuroscience and how the brain works best. 

I'd like to tell you about what it is that makes the brain most motivated, engaged, perseverance, especially when they are things that the child, or student, or person doesn't want to do. When are students, for example, kids, most engaged in something? What is there that they love to do and keep doing despite set backs and failures. And it turns out, you look, and playing video games. There is something in playing video games that motivates. And I wanted to find out what it was and see if it could be applied to the classroom.

What I found out after looking at the research and my speciality of neuro-imaging, is that there are three components that are happening when a video gamer is engaged. There's buy-in, they know what they are going get even though it is fantasy. THere is achievable challenge, when someone is playing a video game they are at their right level where there is challenge but it is achievable. If they can do whatever the challenge is at level one the game doesn't make them wait for anyone else to catch up, they get advanced to level two, level three. So there's achievement, there's challenge so they are always playing at a level that is just right for them. They can't do it. 

And then there's frequent feedback. They are constantly making moves, predictions, higher, lower, how do I do that. And there's immediate feedback whether you get progressed or not.

So the three elements that we can deconstruction: buy-in, playing or learning at your achievable challenge level and frequent feedback. You do that and video game players, even though they make mistakes and fail 80% of the time, they are motivated to keep going.

So what we have learned and what this means in terms of student learning from this video game model is to incorporate certain aspects of that model in order to get students motivated, especially those who really have lost interest in a subject or lost confidence that they can do it. So we need to consider those three elements. Buy-in - making sure from the very beginning that there is something they believe will be positive if they put in the time and effort. Number two is achievable challenge. Students have different background knowledge, different prior experience so assessing what they already know, what they have mastery in, and what they lack. And making sure that differentiation and individualisation is available so that students are learning at a place that is challenging for them but it is achievable there is a possibility of being successful. 

And again with the video game model frequent corrective feedback that is letting them know whether they're progressing, whether their effort towards the goal is making a difference. In a video game they are getting points, they are getting to see that they go to another level. In school we don't frequently give the feedback of effort to progress along the way to a goal but the brain rewards the intrinsic gratification, that intrinsic pleasure is the chemical response, dopamine pleasure. And to make sure that happens, to keep kids engaged letting them know that they are making progress to that goal along the way will find that motivation mindset grow. 

Date added: 05/20/2013
What can we learn from video games?
Date added: 05/20/2013

What can we learn from video games?

Dr Judy Willis is a board-certified neurologist and teacher from California. In this talk she outlines outlines three key things we can learn as educators from her research into student engagement with video games.

Views 10,651 Date added: 20/05/2013

What can we learn from video games?

Hi my name is Dr Judy Willis, I'm a neurologist and teacher/educator and now lecturer around the world about neuroscience and how the brain works best. 

I'd like to tell you about what it is that makes the brain most motivated, engaged, perseverance, especially when they are things that the child, or student, or person doesn't want to do. When are students, for example, kids, most engaged in something? What is there that they love to do and keep doing despite set backs and failures. And it turns out, you look, and playing video games. There is something in playing video games that motivates. And I wanted to find out what it was and see if it could be applied to the classroom.

What I found out after looking at the research and my speciality of neuro-imaging, is that there are three components that are happening when a video gamer is engaged. There's buy-in, they know what they are going get even though it is fantasy. THere is achievable challenge, when someone is playing a video game they are at their right level where there is challenge but it is achievable. If they can do whatever the challenge is at level one the game doesn't make them wait for anyone else to catch up, they get advanced to level two, level three. So there's achievement, there's challenge so they are always playing at a level that is just right for them. They can't do it. 

And then there's frequent feedback. They are constantly making moves, predictions, higher, lower, how do I do that. And there's immediate feedback whether you get progressed or not.

So the three elements that we can deconstruction: buy-in, playing or learning at your achievable challenge level and frequent feedback. You do that and video game players, even though they make mistakes and fail 80% of the time, they are motivated to keep going.

So what we have learned and what this means in terms of student learning from this video game model is to incorporate certain aspects of that model in order to get students motivated, especially those who really have lost interest in a subject or lost confidence that they can do it. So we need to consider those three elements. Buy-in - making sure from the very beginning that there is something they believe will be positive if they put in the time and effort. Number two is achievable challenge. Students have different background knowledge, different prior experience so assessing what they already know, what they have mastery in, and what they lack. And making sure that differentiation and individualisation is available so that students are learning at a place that is challenging for them but it is achievable there is a possibility of being successful. 

And again with the video game model frequent corrective feedback that is letting them know whether they're progressing, whether their effort towards the goal is making a difference. In a video game they are getting points, they are getting to see that they go to another level. In school we don't frequently give the feedback of effort to progress along the way to a goal but the brain rewards the intrinsic gratification, that intrinsic pleasure is the chemical response, dopamine pleasure. And to make sure that happens, to keep kids engaged letting them know that they are making progress to that goal along the way will find that motivation mindset grow. 

Hi my name is Dr Judy Willis, I'm a neurologist and teacher/educator and now lecturer around the world about neuroscience and how the brain works best. 

I'd like to tell you about what it is that makes the brain most motivated, engaged, perseverance, especially when they are things that the child, or student, or person doesn't want to do. When are students, for example, kids, most engaged in something? What is there that they love to do and keep doing despite set backs and failures. And it turns out, you look, and playing video games. There is something in playing video games that motivates. And I wanted to find out what it was and see if it could be applied to the classroom.

What I found out after looking at the research and my speciality of neuro-imaging, is that there are three components that are happening when a video gamer is engaged. There's buy-in, they know what they are going get even though it is fantasy. THere is achievable challenge, when someone is playing a video game they are at their right level where there is challenge but it is achievable. If they can do whatever the challenge is at level one the game doesn't make them wait for anyone else to catch up, they get advanced to level two, level three. So there's achievement, there's challenge so they are always playing at a level that is just right for them. They can't do it. 

And then there's frequent feedback. They are constantly making moves, predictions, higher, lower, how do I do that. And there's immediate feedback whether you get progressed or not.

So the three elements that we can deconstruction: buy-in, playing or learning at your achievable challenge level and frequent feedback. You do that and video game players, even though they make mistakes and fail 80% of the time, they are motivated to keep going.

So what we have learned and what this means in terms of student learning from this video game model is to incorporate certain aspects of that model in order to get students motivated, especially those who really have lost interest in a subject or lost confidence that they can do it. So we need to consider those three elements. Buy-in - making sure from the very beginning that there is something they believe will be positive if they put in the time and effort. Number two is achievable challenge. Students have different background knowledge, different prior experience so assessing what they already know, what they have mastery in, and what they lack. And making sure that differentiation and individualisation is available so that students are learning at a place that is challenging for them but it is achievable there is a possibility of being successful. 

And again with the video game model frequent corrective feedback that is letting them know whether they're progressing, whether their effort towards the goal is making a difference. In a video game they are getting points, they are getting to see that they go to another level. In school we don't frequently give the feedback of effort to progress along the way to a goal but the brain rewards the intrinsic gratification, that intrinsic pleasure is the chemical response, dopamine pleasure. And to make sure that happens, to keep kids engaged letting them know that they are making progress to that goal along the way will find that motivation mindset grow. 

Date added: 20/05/2013

What can we learn from video games?

Dr Judy Willis is a board-certified neurologist and teacher from California. In this talk she outlines outlines three key things we can learn as educators from her research into student engagement with video games.

Views 10,651 Date added: 20/05/2013

What can we learn from video games?

Hi my name is Dr Judy Willis, I'm a neurologist and teacher/educator and now lecturer around the world about neuroscience and how the brain works best. 

I'd like to tell you about what it is that makes the brain most motivated, engaged, perseverance, especially when they are things that the child, or student, or person doesn't want to do. When are students, for example, kids, most engaged in something? What is there that they love to do and keep doing despite set backs and failures. And it turns out, you look, and playing video games. There is something in playing video games that motivates. And I wanted to find out what it was and see if it could be applied to the classroom.

What I found out after looking at the research and my speciality of neuro-imaging, is that there are three components that are happening when a video gamer is engaged. There's buy-in, they know what they are going get even though it is fantasy. THere is achievable challenge, when someone is playing a video game they are at their right level where there is challenge but it is achievable. If they can do whatever the challenge is at level one the game doesn't make them wait for anyone else to catch up, they get advanced to level two, level three. So there's achievement, there's challenge so they are always playing at a level that is just right for them. They can't do it. 

And then there's frequent feedback. They are constantly making moves, predictions, higher, lower, how do I do that. And there's immediate feedback whether you get progressed or not.

So the three elements that we can deconstruction: buy-in, playing or learning at your achievable challenge level and frequent feedback. You do that and video game players, even though they make mistakes and fail 80% of the time, they are motivated to keep going.

So what we have learned and what this means in terms of student learning from this video game model is to incorporate certain aspects of that model in order to get students motivated, especially those who really have lost interest in a subject or lost confidence that they can do it. So we need to consider those three elements. Buy-in - making sure from the very beginning that there is something they believe will be positive if they put in the time and effort. Number two is achievable challenge. Students have different background knowledge, different prior experience so assessing what they already know, what they have mastery in, and what they lack. And making sure that differentiation and individualisation is available so that students are learning at a place that is challenging for them but it is achievable there is a possibility of being successful. 

And again with the video game model frequent corrective feedback that is letting them know whether they're progressing, whether their effort towards the goal is making a difference. In a video game they are getting points, they are getting to see that they go to another level. In school we don't frequently give the feedback of effort to progress along the way to a goal but the brain rewards the intrinsic gratification, that intrinsic pleasure is the chemical response, dopamine pleasure. And to make sure that happens, to keep kids engaged letting them know that they are making progress to that goal along the way will find that motivation mindset grow. 

Hi my name is Dr Judy Willis, I'm a neurologist and teacher/educator and now lecturer around the world about neuroscience and how the brain works best. 

I'd like to tell you about what it is that makes the brain most motivated, engaged, perseverance, especially when they are things that the child, or student, or person doesn't want to do. When are students, for example, kids, most engaged in something? What is there that they love to do and keep doing despite set backs and failures. And it turns out, you look, and playing video games. There is something in playing video games that motivates. And I wanted to find out what it was and see if it could be applied to the classroom.

What I found out after looking at the research and my speciality of neuro-imaging, is that there are three components that are happening when a video gamer is engaged. There's buy-in, they know what they are going get even though it is fantasy. THere is achievable challenge, when someone is playing a video game they are at their right level where there is challenge but it is achievable. If they can do whatever the challenge is at level one the game doesn't make them wait for anyone else to catch up, they get advanced to level two, level three. So there's achievement, there's challenge so they are always playing at a level that is just right for them. They can't do it. 

And then there's frequent feedback. They are constantly making moves, predictions, higher, lower, how do I do that. And there's immediate feedback whether you get progressed or not.

So the three elements that we can deconstruction: buy-in, playing or learning at your achievable challenge level and frequent feedback. You do that and video game players, even though they make mistakes and fail 80% of the time, they are motivated to keep going.

So what we have learned and what this means in terms of student learning from this video game model is to incorporate certain aspects of that model in order to get students motivated, especially those who really have lost interest in a subject or lost confidence that they can do it. So we need to consider those three elements. Buy-in - making sure from the very beginning that there is something they believe will be positive if they put in the time and effort. Number two is achievable challenge. Students have different background knowledge, different prior experience so assessing what they already know, what they have mastery in, and what they lack. And making sure that differentiation and individualisation is available so that students are learning at a place that is challenging for them but it is achievable there is a possibility of being successful. 

And again with the video game model frequent corrective feedback that is letting them know whether they're progressing, whether their effort towards the goal is making a difference. In a video game they are getting points, they are getting to see that they go to another level. In school we don't frequently give the feedback of effort to progress along the way to a goal but the brain rewards the intrinsic gratification, that intrinsic pleasure is the chemical response, dopamine pleasure. And to make sure that happens, to keep kids engaged letting them know that they are making progress to that goal along the way will find that motivation mindset grow. 

Date added: 20/05/2013

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